Orange Souffle, 3 Ways

I ate so many oranges this winter that of course, I couldn’t resist the urge to bake more with oranges. Then I found out that the local coop sells loose dark chocolate chips. Orange and dark chocolate is one of my favorite flavor combinations, so after consuming lots of chocolate chips by themselves, I made a dark chocolate version of my orange souffle. To prevent myself from endlessly eating chocolate chips, I came up with a cocoa powder one, too.

This post has been over a month in the making! Almost all of it was done around mid-March—there was one week where half of what I ate was souffles. But then I didn’t have time to finish tweaking the cocoa powder version until last week. Here at last is my orange souffle extravaganza!

Orange zest is SO. AWESOME.

 

Dark Chocolate Orange Souffle

This souffle is delightfully chocolatey. Deep, rich flavors that taste like an orange chocolate bar without the density.

DARK CHOCOLATE ORANGE SOUFFLE
2         ounces bittersweet or semisweet chocolate pieces*
1         egg, separated
\frac{1}{8}         teaspoon vanilla extract
1         pinch salt
1         tablespoon flour (optional)**
1         tablespoon milk (optional)**
juice and zest from 1 orange***

a bit of vegetable cooking oil
a bit of white sugar

* Equivalent to \frac{1}{3} cup chocolate chips.
** Leaving out the flour and milk results in a denser souffle reminiscent of a molten lava cake.
*** I like to use all the juice from one orange. Using half the juice avoids overfilling the ramekin (see photo below) and is less likely to result in a small half-liquid layer at the bottom of the finished souffle.

  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Brush a 1-cup ramekin with vegetable cooking oil, and sprinkle the inside of the ramekin with sugar.
  2. Beat egg whites and salt until soft peaks form.
  3. Mix egg yolk with orange juice, zest, and vanilla. Mix in milk and flour if including.
  4. Melt chocolate. Heat orange egg mix slightly to prevent the chocolate from seizing. Add orange egg mixture to melted chocolate.
  5. Mix 1/4 of beaten egg whites into chocolate orange mixture until fully incorporated. Gently fold in remaining egg whites. Take care to keep as much air in the mixture as possible.
  6. Scoop into prepared ramekin. Bake souffle until puffed but still moist in the center, about 15 minutes. Dust top with powdered sugar and garnish with orange peels. Serve immediately.

Yield: 1 souffle

 

Overfilling the ramekin is not a good idea:

But still edible!

Turns out that melting chocolate is trickier than just sticking a bunch of chocolate in the microwave. I am incredibly lazy, so I melted my chocolate chips in the microwave, but even that required more than just nuking them. For tips on melting chocolate, check out What’s Cooking America and Noob Cook.

Ready for nomming!

Almost too pretty to eat.

Mmmmm…

 

Spiced Cocoa Orange Souffle

For a lighter chocolate orange souffle, I used cocoa powder. On a whim, I threw in some cinnamon and nutmeg. The flavors in this souffle are more subtle than in the other two, hence only half the zest to avoid overpowering the other flavors. A whole orange’s worth of powdered zest might be okay, but I’m too lazy to make powdered zest.

SPICED COCOA ORANGE SOUFFLE
2         teaspoons unsweetened cocoa powder
1         egg, separated
1         tablespoon white sugar
\frac{1}{8}         teaspoon vanilla extract
1         pinch salt
\frac{1}{2}         teaspoon ground cinnamon
\frac{1}{8}         teaspoon ground nutmeg
juice from 1 orange
zest from 1/2 orange

a bit of vegetable cooking oil
a bit of white sugar

  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Brush a 1-cup ramekin with vegetable cooking oil, and sprinkle the inside of the ramekin with sugar.
  2. Beat egg whites and salt until soft peaks form. Gradually add in the spices, about a quarter of the cocoa powder, and the tablespoon of sugar while continuing to beat egg whites until stiff peaks form.
  3. Mix egg yolk with orange juice, vanilla, and remaining cocoa powder.
  4. Mix 1/4 of beaten egg whites into orange egg mixture until fully incorporated. Gently fold in remaining egg whites. Take care to keep as much air in the mixture as possible.
  5. Scoop into prepared ramekin. Bake souffle until puffed but still moist in the center, about 15 minutes. Dust top with powdered sugar and garnish with orange peels. Serve immediately.

Yield: 1 souffle

 

Fun with garnishes.

Orangey orange.

Care for a bite?

 

Just Orange Souffle

This souffle is amazing, if I do say so myself. Unbelievably light and fluffy. It’s like eating orange-flavored clouds!

ORANGE SOUFFLE
1         egg, separated
1         tablespoon white sugar
\frac{1}{8}         teaspoon vanilla extract
1         pinch salt
1         tablespoon milk (optional)*
juice and zest from 1 orange**

a bit of vegetable cooking oil
a bit of white sugar

* Adding milk gives a creamsicle flavor. If adding milk, use only half the juice from the orange.
** Be very careful not to zest the bitter white pith. While you should always avoid zesting the pith, there are no other flavors in this souffle to hide any bitterness.

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Brush a 1-cup ramekin with vegetable cooking oil, and sprinkle the inside of the ramekin with sugar.
  2. Beat egg whites and salt until soft peaks form. Gradually add in the tablespoon of sugar while continuing to beat egg whites until stiff peaks form.
  3. Mix egg yolk with orange juice, zest, and vanilla. Mix in milk if including.
  4. Mix 1/4 of beaten egg whites into orange egg mixture until fully incorporated. Gently fold in remaining egg whites. Take care to keep as much air in the mixture as possible.
  5. Scoop into prepared ramekin. Bake souffle until puffed but still moist in the center, about 20 minutes. Dust top with powdered sugar and garnish with orange peels. Serve immediately.

Yield: 1 souffle, or 2 filled souffle oranges

 

Look at how fluffy this batter is!

If you use oranges as souffle cups (inspired by 6bittersweet‘s guest post on Indian Simmer), I highly recommend slicing off a tiny sliver from the bottom of the oranges. It lets the oranges stand straight and prevents this from happening:

Of course, ramekins work just as well as oranges:

Not as fancy…


…but just as delicious.


NOM…

…OM…

…OMOMOMOMOM.

 

 

For the photography geeks, here’s the photo setup I used:

Pretend the binder is a foam board for bouncing off light…
Great big window is just out of the frame on the left.

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11 thoughts on “Orange Souffle, 3 Ways

    • Thank you!! I’ve been working on my photography, and I’m so glad to hear it’s paying off!

      In case you’re interested, I use a Canon PowerShot SD1400 IS Digital ELPH camera. It’s not a fancy DSLR, but it is a surprisingly good point-and-shoot.

      • If the white binder doesn’t bounce off enough light, you can also try covering the binder with aluminum foil. If the foil reflects light too harshly, crumpling the foil first will give a softer light.

        I also sometimes use a portable mirror for smaller photo objects, but the light from that can be very uneven–it’s more of a spotlight effect.

  1. GOOD GOD WOMAN

    I’m drooling. DROOLING. Oh my goodness. OH MY GOODNESSSSSSS. It all looks so gorgeous! Your photography! YOUR BAKING! I desperately want a spoonful… ;_;

    Also I agree! ORANGE ZEST IS AMAZING!!!

    • <3 Come visit meeeeeee and I will make you all of these!! <3 <3

      We can also have an orange zest party. Because orange zest!!

  2. Pingback: Happy New Year! | the whimsy turtle

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