Bob-omb Tortoise

A belated happy Halloween from the cutest, grumpiest, and hungriest Bob-omb ever!

Now I really am da bomb!

This year, I tried something new and posted a serialized, weeklong story about Bob-omb Kirby and Mario on Tumblr, Facebook, and Instagram. That is why this post is so late: I didn’t want to spoil the story!

Shello, Mario!

Why is Mario the star of this game, and not me?!

Do I get treats for sitting in this costume?

Pattern: My own, with inspiration from WolfDreamer’s pattern that I tried out many years ago
Hook sizes: G/6 (4.25 mm)
Yarns & thread:

· Lily Sugar’n Cream in Black, White, and Yellow
· Vanna’s Choice (100% acrylic) in Grey
Other materials: three small paperclips, straightened

Wondering what happened when Bob-omb Kirby met Mario? Read on!

At last, I get to meet the famous Super Mario!

Did you know Bob-ombs run on radicchio fuel? Bob-omb Kirby was enjoying a delicious refueling when clumsy Mario almost ran into him with a Koopa Troopa shell…

Mario claimed he was holding “just an old shell.” This explanation seemed mighty suspicious, especially when Mario wouldn’t say where he got the Koopa Troopa shell. Inspector Kirby leaves no mystery unsolved, so he moved in for a closer look…and found a terrified Koopa Troopa hiding inside!!

After Inspector Kirby discovered the terrified Koopa Troopa hiding in Mario’s shell, he got some radicchio to give to Mario’s poor kidnapping victim. Mario immediately threw the shell far over Bob-omb Kirby’s head! Then Mario tried to jump over Bob-omb Kirby himself!

Bob-omb Kirby decided to teach Mario a lesson: No one mistreats shells and gets away with it! So Bob-omb Kirby chased Mario off the set!

Shells: 1, Mario: 0!

I actually prepared two different backgrounds for Kirby’s Bob-omb photoshoot: One smaller one…

More background visible, but…

I ended up not using this for any photos with Kirby at all because the second background I prepared looked so much better because they were perfectly scaled to look like Bob-omb Kirby and Mario were running around in the real game!

Hi, Mario—whoa, watch out!

Sheesh, Mario, watch where you are going!

Did you see that? Mario almost crashed into me!

No treats for me?! Harumph!

As always, I took plenty of glamour shots and close-ups of Kirby’s costume!

How could anyone stop at one photo (or ten) of this cute face?

As usual, Kirby was perfectly capable of walking on his own while wearing just the top half of his costume. Trouble on the move!

These feet are the same color as yummy dandies. This means these feet are yummy, too, right?

Plus, a video of Bob-omb Kirby in full nomming action!

Now for the crafty details!

As always, I tried to tailor the top half of Kirby’s costume to fit his shell exactly. This year, I tried something different. In previous years, I crocheted simple increasing single crochet circles until I got to a point where I had to improvise with double crochets or even treble crochets to get to the exact shape of Kirby’s shell, which is not perfectly circular. This year, I started out off the bat with an oval, with dcs thrown in at the ends starting in early rounds. This did let me reach the right shape more quickly, but the top half ended up being too flat and not curving to match the curve of Kirby’s shell. It still curved enough to suffice, but I’ll be going back to my old method next year.

Don’t try to fix what isn’t broken!

Kirby’s Bob-omb Costume, Partial Pattern (minus top half)

Bob-omb bottom half: Ball part
Worked in continuous rounds:
Chain 2. Sc 6 in second chain from hook.
Rnd 1             Inc around. (12)
Rnd 2             *Inc, sc 1* around. (18)
Rnd 3             *Inc, sc 2* around. (24)
Rnd 4             *Inc, sc 3* around. (30)
Rnd 5             *Inc, sc 4* around. (36)
Rnd 6             *Inc, sc 5* around. (42)
Rnd 7-8         Sc around. (24)
Finish off.

Bob-omb bottom half: Cap
Worked in continuous rounds:
Chain 2. Sc 6 in second chain from hook.
Rnd 1             Inc around. (12)
Rnd 2             *Inc, sc* around. (18)
Rnd 3             *Inc, sc 2* around. (24)
Rnd 4             *Inc, sc 3* around. (30)
Rnd 5             *Inc, sc 4* around. (36)
Rnd 6             *Inc, sc 5* around. (42)
Finish off. Leave a long tail for sewing cap to ball part of bottom half.

Stuff ball part of bottom half and sew on cap to close. Sew cap to Rnd 7 of the ball part, not Rnd 8.

Bob-omb feet (make 2)
Worked in rows:
Chain 9.
Row 1             2 dc in 3rd ch from hook (beginning ch counts as first dc), dc in next 5 ch, 6 dc in last ch, turn to
work along opposite side of beginning ch, dc in next 5 ch, 3 dc in last ch, slip st in beginning ch to join. (22)
Row 2             Ch 1, sc in back loops only in each st around, slip st in beginning ch to join. (22)
Row 3             Sl st in first st, hdc2tog, sc in next 5 sts, hdc2tog 3 times, sc in next 5 sts, hdc2tog, hdc2tog in next st and in first st of previous row, slip st in beginning ch to join. (16)
Row 4             Ch 1, hdc2tog, sc in next 3 sts, hdc2tog 2 times, sc in next 3 sts, hdc2tog, slip st in beginning ch to join. (12)
Row 5             Ch 1, hdc2tog 6 times, slip st in beginning ch to join. (6)
Finish off. Leave a long tail for sewing feet to ball part of bottom half.

Bob-omb key (make 2)
Chain 40. Sc in each st starting with 2nd chain from hook.
Finish off. Leave a long tail for sewing feet to back of top half.
Thread straightened paper clips into stitches and shape. Sew in place.

Bob-omb cap
Worked in rows:
Chain 2. Sc 7 in second chain from hook, slip st in beginning ch to join.
Row 1             2 dc in each st around, slip st in beginning ch to join. (14)
Row 2             Hdc in back loops only in each st around, slip st in beginning ch to join. (14)
Finish off. Leave a long tail for sewing to top half.

Bob-omb fuse
Chain 4 in white. Without finishing off, change to black and chain 3. Sc in 2nd chain from hook. Sc in next st. Change back to white. Sc in each remaining st.
Finish off. Leave a long tail for sewing to gray cap.

Bob-omb eyes
Chain 2. In 2nd chain from hook, sc, dc, hdc, and sc.
Finish off. Leave a long tail for sewing to top half.

Assemble by sewing feet to bottom half, key to back of top half, fuse to top of gray cap, gray cap to middle of top half, and eyes to front of top half.

I wanted to make an easier and simpler costume this year after Kirby’s super elaborate BB-8 costume last year. Bob-omb was simpler in some ways, but not as simple as I had been hoping! I ran into two issues: (1) what to do about Bob-omb’s eyes, since they should go where Kirby’s head was, and (2) how to make the feet. For the first issue, I decided to just make the top half of each eye, which amazingly turned out okay.

The feet were much trickier to make than I anticipated. I wanted feet that Bob-omb could actually stand on and be stable. The feet in the pattern I used for my Bob-omb plushie are very unstable because they go only halfway under the round bottom. I first tried making feet that conformed to the round bottom…

D:

…This obviously looked awful. After much hairpulling, I stumbled on this Etsy listing that solved my problem: Instead of crocheting the feet front to back, I crocheted the feet from the bottom up. Once I figured this out, it was easy to design the feet using the fluffy baby booties I made before as a guide.

Much better! This was a little too small, but very close to the final design!

The last puzzle in designing Kirby’s Bob-omb costume was the key: When I made my Bob-omb plushie many years ago, I came across an Etsy listing advertising a Bob-omb amigurumi with a turnable key. I didn’t have time when I made my Bob-omb amigurumi to make the key turnable, but that’s always been something I wanted to do. I decided to do that this time!

I solved the puzzle this time using straightened paper clips to both hold the key’s shape (which was necessary this time because the key was bigger) and make the key turnable. For the shape, I went with a more accurate shape this time, instead of a figure eight like last time.

Ta da! (Not sewn fast yet.)

For making the key turnable, I bent one straightened paper clip in half, stuck the bent end into the “stalk” of the key, left the two ends sticking out of the end of the key, threaded the two metal ends through a hole in the back of the top of Kirby’s costume, and bent the metal ends ninety degrees. I then had two options: either make the entire key turn, including the paper clip ends sticking out at ninety degrees, or sew in place the paper clip that stuck out and have the yarn on the key “stalk” turn around the paper clip that was threaded through the key “stalk.”

I first tried option one:

This is the inside of the top half.

I quickly realized this approach resulted in two significant problems: The metal ends rotated outside of the costume and became visible, and the metal ends would likely scrape against Kirby’s shell and either cause him discomfort or scratch the back end of his shell where he is extremely ticklish (and thus cause him to run away at top speed). So I changed to the second approach.

There was one final adjustment I needed to make: I had threaded the metal ends through the space between two stitches at the back end of the top half of Kirby’s costume. This space was far larger than double the width of paper clip metal. So the key drooped down significantly. This was easily solved by stuffing part of the space with a big knot of black yarn.

And with that, Kirby’s Bob-omb costume came into being! You can see the key turning in the video above, and watch Kirby trundle around in just the top half of his costume, a ticking bomb of cuteness!

Who wants to guess how long this costume will fit ever-growing Kirby?

I WANT TREATS EVERY DAY!

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